Monday, January 5, 2015

Things I Learned RVing


levelThere are many things we learn as we move from one lifestyle to another.   RVing is no different.   We’ve certainly learned a lot on our own.  What works for others doesn’t mean it’ll work for everyone else.  However, there sure are a lot of folks out there telling all of us what we should and shouldn’t do.  Here are some things we learned all by ourselves.   Many of these need no explanation about how we learned.  Just use your own imagination on some.

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The GPS is a mighty important tool and we’d never want to be without one.  As mighty as it might be, it’s not always accurate.  Checking the map before venturing into unknown territory may save hours and hours of frustration. 

Making reservations well in advance doesn’t always work for us.  Cancelling may not be free regardless of how many days or months in advance you decide to cancel. 

My father was right  …. after a few days even good company can start cartoon535smelling like fish.  It’s best to get on the road before we hang around too long in any one area.

Stocking our refrigerator with lots of fresh food usually means much of it may be thrown out.  There are far too many tempting restaurants that we haven’t sampled at yet. 

Losing weight creates face wrinkles.  When you gain it back because of all the restaurants you’ve frequented with your RVing friends, those wrinkles go away.

It’s best to empty the tanks before they start overflowing in the shower.  It’s also a good idea to double check the septic tank valve to be sure it’s pushed in before hitting the road.  This is not the best way to arrive at your destination with empty tanks.

If something can go wrong, it just might.  A good walk around the RV before pulling out may save a huge repair bill especially if you’re still plugged into the electrical connections before you start moving.

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Dry camping in the desert can be amazing … but short intervals work best for us.   We’ve become rather fond of electricity, flowing water and sewer facilities.  We are also less fond of being in the center of  large cities.

Ignore the urge to drive your vehicle over trails and rocks if the tires weren’t designed for that type of terrain.  Then, don’t try to repeat the same mistake a few days later.  

Internet, cell phone service and satellite TV reception is an absolute must.  Tall trees aren’t TV friendly and distant places may mean no internet.  These are places we prefer to avoid.

Membership clubs have advantages and disadvantages.  Belonging to the Elks has been one of our favorite organizations. Many Elks have RV parks close to popular destinations. Resort Parks Int’l is another favcartoon494orite.  We’ve learned what works for one doesn’t necessarily work for others.  Passport America may work but not if you travel during high season.  We only renew when we’re ready to use.

An RV furnace can keep you warm on cold nights but the Big Mr. Heater is better.  Our Mr. Heater uses no AC or battery, runs on less propane and heats the RV up much faster.  We don’t use the small propane bottles. We have it connected to our RV propane tank using a quick connect.   We’ve also learned having an outside auxiliary tank is a lifesaver.

Having  a 4-cylinder vehicle or one that sits low to the ground won’t happen again.  We prefer a vehicle that sits up higher and has more juice for climbing hills and accelerating on freeways.

The two most popular clothing items in the RV world are jeans and t-shirts.  Neither of us had ever worn jeans and rarely wore t-shirts until after RVing.  Now those are the clothing items we have the most of in our RV closets.

sewer12Don’t judge others.  Making assumptions about folks based on the RV they travel in is usually way off track.  You can’t tell much about the people by the RV they drive.  You’re more apt to be fooled than you think.  There are nice people and not so nice people in all types of units.

It’s okay to take a nap.

Good times can be better when shared but it’s also okay not to fit in and not want to share.   There are some amazing people in this world we never would have met had we not traveled in our RV.   There are also folks we just have nothing in common with and that’s okay too.  So, if the party gets boring, just leave.

Only buy black licorice.  Most people don’t like the black licorice or black jelly beans so if you stock up, you won’t have to share.

There’s always something to look forward to and always something new to learn every day.

‘Tis life on the road.

Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind.

22 comments:

  1. These are so funny - especially since we all know we've done some or know someone who fits one or more.

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  2. "It’s okay to take a nap." - Especially for CRAZY people (like you !! LOL) that gets up at 4 o'clock in the morning ! I need to take a nap pretty much every day and I definitely don't get up that early !!

    I LOVE LOVE LOVE my Mr. Heaters - yes I have two. But I DO use those small propane bottles and re-fill them. Works out to be .65 cents a canister at today's propane prices. I prefer it this way as I can then move my Mr. Heater around different areas of the rig.

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  3. Amen! To it all. Especially the black licorice. I love black licorice!

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    1. I'm not taking any to Q so I don't have to share.

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  4. I like black licorice. Aren't you glad I'm not coming to Arizona this winter? :)

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    1. I guess now I know who to hide the black licorice from.

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  5. Jim would fight you for that black licorice and jelly beans. Love this post. Some fantastic points.

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  6. Loved your post! And I love Black Jelly Beans but not black licorice. And we are in and out of AZ. ( Are you close to Pilot Knob this month :)

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    1. We're in Tempe right now and not sure if we'll head south to Pilot Knob after Q or north to Parker.

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  7. Excellent, we do learn a lot on our own and always makes for a never boring lifestyle.

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  8. Never too old to learn a thing or two!

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    Replies
    1. We know that because we keep learning.

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  9. A most excellent post! ".....don't try to repeat the same mistake a few days later" - don't you just love how some lessons have to be learned more than once to sink in? Pearls of wisdom here. I'm paying attention :-))

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  10. What a great post. I love black jelly beans. I bought pounds of them at Wakaruska Dime store.

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  11. Wonderful, wonderful. We both laughed. So true. And Jan and I will be there for the black licorice.

    HOPE YOU DON'T MIND, I SHARED THIS ON FACEBOOK.

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  12. smiled all the way through :)

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  13. One thing I learned on one of our first trips out was that the GPS doesn't tell you whether the cul-de-sac at the end of the road you're on is big enough to turn your rig with a toad on a dolly around in. (it wasn't and thank God for the guy who helped me unhook everything at 9:30 PM in the dark.)

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    Replies
    1. Funny!! We seem to learn the hard way on some things.

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  14. Hi there... enjoyed your recap, and especially appreciated the reminder to "not judge others." We do come in a variety of rigs, amenities, styles and preferences. If others do it one way, it doesn't mean that another way is wrong... just different. Our friends Karen & Bob have a slogan on their motorhome door that reads, "Suits Us." I like that. Whatever is right for you is right for you... go for it. We have learned so much in these first two years as fulltime RVers, and look forward to continuing lessons as we refine what suits us and learn better ways. Great that so many are eager to share their experiences. Lessons from you two, and others... much of it started here two years ago :) Look forward to gathering later this month! Be well! Dianne & Tom

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